Free Turkey Clip Art

Just in time for Thanksgiving, download your free turkey clip art here!

TurkeyAndFeathersTitlePage

Click here to see my full file available on TeachersPayTeachers.com. It includes a full turkey body (which you can download for free below), an empty turkey body with no feathers, nine colored feathers, and all of the above in blackline as well.

This file is great for Thanksgiving-themed games because the feathers are removable and come in nine colors. You could print and cut out the feathers and body and play a “pin the feather on the turkey” game. You could put two of each feather in a box and have students draw one out to select partners. You could use them in a SMART Notebook file and have the feathers disappear to reveal a question from a unit you are teaching. What other ideas do you have? Leave a comment below.

And because I like you, here is the full turkey body image to download for free. (Click on image to load bigger version, then right click and select “Save Image As”.)

Turkey

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

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My Store

My TpT store is filled with innovative and fun ways to teach music.

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Have you visited Mrs. Martin’s Music Room on TeachersPayTeachers.com yet?

My store features products for music teachers and classroom teachers. Everything I post is something I created for myself to use, so you know it has been classroom-tested and it works with real students. Here are some of my favorites:

BGBCover

Beethoven Grab Bag: This game has kids reaching in to a bag and pulling out a fact about Beethoven. They read the fact then guess whether it is true or false. The more advanced version is “Beethoven in a Nutshell”: you put question cards into a hard hat or bike helmet (the “nutshell”, get it? hee hee) and students have to answer the question on the card to earn points for their team. Other ideas are included in the directions.

Choir Listening Cards

Choir Listening Cards: This activity was really successful with my middle school choirs. I made a set of 16 cards with questions that would focus a listener on a certain aspect of a vocal music performance (phrasing or dynamics, for example). I would have one student sit out, holding a card, and listen to the choir sing a song. Afterward, the listener would answer the question and give the choir feedback. It worked really well because singers respond better to a peer than they do to an adult.

RecorderRubric

Recorder Rubric: This is the first recorder rubric that was posted on TpT. It has stayed the same since 2012 because it is so good! I use this in my classroom every week. When a student or group plays a Recorder Karate song for me, I go over the rubric with them. They are uplifted because the wording does not make them feel bad. They are empowered because they realize the skills are in their power to learn. I have truly seen great progress in the areas of tone, hand position, fluency, and tonguing since implementing this rubric.

It is my goal to provide products that are useful, inspirational, unique, and time-saving! I’d love to hear any feedback you have so I can continue to improve my offerings. Thanks for reading and be sure to visit Mrs. Martin’s Music Room on TeachersPayTeachers.com!

More Love for Back to School!

There is a bonus sale Wednesday on TeachersPayTeachers.com! The promo code is “MORE15”. This is your second chance to pick up those things on your wish list if you missed this month’s previous sale. Couple that with TpT credits you’ve stored up from leaving feedback, and you’ve got yourself a DISCOUNT!

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Here are some products that would be great buys during the sale.

1. Orchestra Instrument clip art by Dancing Crayon Designs

I love Dancing Crayon’s clip art. The music collections are always very thorough, never leaving anything out. And all of the instrument images are “anatomically correct” so you never have to worry about accuracy or confusion between two similar instruments. The orchestra instrument clip art collection would be perfect for making instrument flash cards, instrument labels, games for an instrument unit, or illustrations for a digital or printed instrument unit. This one has been on my wish list for a while and I think it’s time to buy it!

2. Poke Sheet: Music Symbols by Mrs. Martin’s Music Room

I am SO excited to announce the newest addition to my Poke Sheet collection: music symbols! This worksheet is best used as a review of common music symbols for upper elementary or middle school students. It includes music symbols that most students learn in first or second grade: treble clef, repeat sign, crescendo and decrescendo, quarter note, two eighth notes, quarter rest, half note, piano, forte, etc. The student views a row of music symbols and pokes holes through the ones that don’t belong. Then, on the back of the paper, they must add up the holes in columns to reveal a secret message. The complexity of the worksheet makes it a fun and engaging way for older students to review a somewhat simple topic. Or it can be used as a favorite sub activity! I have more Poke Sheets to come, so keep watching for them!

Now head back to Mrs. Miracle’s Music Room by Aileen Miracle or Music a la Abbott by Amy Abbott to read about more great products on the TpT sale, and see the bottom of their blogs for links to even MORE blogs doing the same!

More Love for Back to School

Music Rules

In my music room, there are three main rules with 4-5 specific bullet points under each.

How many rules should I have?

Many sources say the perfect number of rules is short, between three and five. Lumping all your expectations into three rules means the rules must be vague and open to interpretation. However, practice tells us that kids need to know the specific, concrete expectations they are being held to. My solution was to have three “main” rules with descriptive bullet points under each.

Music Rule #1: Be a LearnerMusic Rule #1: Be a Learner

We are at school to learn. Learning is a lifelong sport and the most important thing you will do here. These behaviors help prepare your brain to learn. In order to learn in this room, you must:

  • Sit in your spot
  • Face forward
  • Pay attention
  • Raise hand to talk
  • Always try

I give a little one- or two-sentence description of each bullet point and what it means. We practice the bullet points as we go. I scan the room to make sure they are following the rules. If anyone breaks or forgets, I go back to the beginning and start over. This sets up the expectation that rules are to be followed and you will enforce it if they’re not.

At this point, I don’t mention consequences. Most students don’t need to know what the consequences are; they are motivated to follow the rules simply because they want to be good and earn approval. The students who do need to know the consequences in advance tend to be the ones who will test the rules to see if you are really going to apply those consequences. (And you better apply those consequences!)

Slide2Music Rule #2: Respect Others

This means you have to be nice to other people and their property: classmates, teachers, building staff, school property.

  • Be nice
  • Listen to the speaker
  • Use positive words
  • Keep hands and feet to yourself
  • Allow others to learn

I explain that “the speaker” means the person who is talking, not a device that is amplifying music! It is hard to explain what “positive words” means, but I always give examples of what negativity looks and sounds like: whining, not trying, saying “this is dumb,” or the worst, “I can’t.” We also discuss how following Rule #2 allows others to follow Rule #1.

Slide3Music Rule #3: Be a Musician

This is the third rule because it’s the third most important. After you have readied your mind to learn and shown respect to others, then you are ready to participate in music.

  • Take care of instruments
  • Only play what…
  • …and when you’re supposed to
  • When music plays: sing or listen
  • Participate in the activity

I explain that when music plays, I will usually tell them if they’re supposed to be singing or listening. They rarely have a choice between the two. However, talking is definitely not an option. The final bullet point is one that is very close to my heart. I don’t care how good you are, I care how hard you try. After all, you can never learn to shoot a basket if you don’t pick up a basketball. You can never learn to read if you don’t touch a book. And you’ll never learn music if you don’t try. If a student has a really stinky attitude, I resort to “yes, you have to do this.” But most of the time a simple reminder that participation and effort are the expectation is enough.

How should I teach the rules?

Each fall, I go over the rules with each class so they know what the rules are. The older kids already know me and my expectations so this goes very quickly, usually less than five minutes at the beginning of the first class. For the middle grades (1-3), I have student volunteers demonstrate the wrong and the right way to perform each expectation. For the very young (pre-K and K), I just read the rules and bullet points slowly, demonstrate them myself, and scan the room to make sure the kids are following them.

Later in the year, the rules are revisited only as needed. I’ve found that Kindergarten typically needs a “rules day” two more times during the year. Pre-K usually doesn’t need reminders of the rules because reinforcement and rewards are naturally built into every activity we do. For older grades, I may simply state the name of the rule (“Donovan, be a learner”) or point to the poster.

Thanks for reading! What rule is the most important to you? Answer in the comments below!

Note: The content in this article is copyrighted. Please visit TeachersPayTeachers.com for your own digital copy of Mrs. Martin’s Music Room Music Rules Posters.

Back-to-School 2015

Here are three great new ideas for Back-to-School 2015!

1. Personality Bingo

Personality Bingo ImageI print off 4×4 bingo sheets with different descriptors in each box. The descriptors includes statements such as, “Someone who is colorblind.” “Someone who has never broken a bone.” “Someone with braces.” Everyone in the room gets the same sheet. You walk around the room and ask people about themselves. When you find someone with a characteristic that matches one ofthe boxes, you hand them your paper and have them sign their name in the box. You continue until most people’s sheets are full. This activity is great because it involves both the extroverted and introverted students. The extroverted students love the chance to walk around and talk to everyone in an unstructured environment. The introverted students appreciate that they only have to talk to one person at a time and that the conversation topics are already provided. You can easily make your own or you can take a look at this one I’ve already made for you.

2. Beethoven Grab Bag

BGBCoverWrite different fun facts about Beethoven (include both true and false!) on small cards or pieces of paper. Fold them and put them in a paper lunch bag decorated with music notes. Hold the bag out to a student, have him or her draw a card, read it out loud, and guess if the statement is true or false. The more unique the facts you include, the more fun the kids will have! I would include about 16 cards for a class of 25. You can put the cards back in the bag and allow them to be read more than once so that everyone gets a turn, or you can just let 16 kids have a turn and do it again the next class period as a review, letting the remaining kids have a turn. If you don’t have the time to make it yourself, check out this one I made for you. There are 18 true/false cards, 18 question/answer cards (with the same facts as the T/F cards), blank cards for you to make your own, clip art for decorating your bag, and ideas for other fun games. Try “Beethoven in a Nutshell”: Put the facts in a helmet (the “nutshell”) and have kids compete for points in a team game!

3. Beethoven Poke Sheet

PSBCover.001This amazingly fun activity allows, no, REQUIRES kids to POKE HOLES in their paper! My room is carpeted and kids have been doing this for years. I’ve only just now realized I can make it into a fun, productive activity! The worksheet is filled with true and false statements about Beethoven (the same ones I’ve included in my Beethoven Grab Bag) next to black dots. The students select the correct answer by poking their pencil through the paper on the black dot. On the back of the page, correct answers (holes) reveal the code to a secret message. If they do the assignment correctly, they will get the message! It was time-consuming to create but I know it’s going to be a hit.

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